10 Hacks to Improve Your Bowel Function

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10 Hacks to Improve Your Bowel Function

Many people experience constipation and diarrhea. These symptoms indicate intestine issues, however, most people ignore these issues. The intestines are the organs responsible for the absorption of vitamins and water. This means that any bowel problem is a huge indicator of your overall health. Constipation can be provoked by many things including poor diet and fluid intake that can lead to the presence of a pathogen (bacteria, fungi) and internal imbalance. Let’s look at these 10  tips to improve your bowel function and support overall health. 

1. Eat fermented foods and products with probiotics

Fermented foods are very beneficial for your gut bacteria since they stimulate good bacteria growth and promote regular bowel movements. Probiotics are the main food of your gut microbes which is found in onions, bananas, oatmeal, asparagus, chicory root, and brown rice. Probiotics are microorganisms that actually live in your gut. You can find probiotics in naturally fermented products like sauerkraut, kefir, tempeh, kombucha, kimchi, miso, etc. 

2. Eat spices­ and herbs

Certain herbs and spices can boost digestion and improve bowel function. They improve nutrient absorption and can soothe digestive discomfort. Add them to your dishes, teas, and salads daily. Here is a list of super spices and herbs to promote digestive function and boost gut health: 

  • Basil 
  • Cinnamon
  • Turmeric
  • Ginger 
  • Cardamom
  • Chamomile

3. Eat more fiber­

Eating fiber-rich foods is a good way to improve digestion and help the intestines eliminate waste. According to the American Heart Association, it’s recommended to eat 25 to 30 grams of fiber every day, but most Americans are eating just half that.

Fiber is a kind of carbohydrate contained only in plants. Every meal should contain a portion of fibrous foods such as cauliflower, berries, broccoli, ground flax seeds, Brussels sprouts, chia seeds, and avocado. Consult your gastroenterologist to make the best plan diet. 

4. Follow daily food and drink routine

Daily food and drink routine can dramatically improve constipation and diarrhea. It helps your body understand that it’s time to drink or eat making it get used to digesting foods properly at a particular time. 

5. Practice Yin Yoga­

Yin Yoga will improve the health of your bones, connective tissue, joints, fascia, and organs including intestines. Practicing asanas that work on the lungs and large intestine can help you get rid of constipation. 

6. Use a standing desk

It’s important to keep moving or at least standing after eating since sitting slows digestion down due to the compression of the abdominal organs. Poor digestion can provoke constipation and an imbalance in your gut microbiome. Try walking, standing or using a standing desk after meals instead.

7. Do breathing exercises

Breathing exercises help reduce anxiety and stress, process emotions, boost immunity, and reduce tension in the body. 10 minutes of breathwork daily will help you relieve muscle tension and regulate bowel movements.

8. Try acupuncture

By stimulating specific pressure points, acupuncture can help relieve tension and get things moving. Studies have found that acupuncture can be as effective as a medicinal therapy for constipation.

9. Eat unsaturated fats instead of saturated fats 

Our intestinal cell walls are made of fat that’s why they need fats for our bodies to function properly. But keep in mind that your intestinal cells don’t need all types of fat. Saturated fat is one of the unhealthy fats that is contained mainly in foods like French fries, bacon, pork, beef, and high-fat dairy foods. This type of fat can keep your intestines from functioning properly. Healthy fats such as macadamia and olive oil, oily fish, avocado, seeds, and nuts soothe the bowels and help remove waste.

10. Take a magnesium supplement­

Magnesium is a muscle and nervous system relaxant which can help you combat stress and anxiety as well as constipation. This substance relaxes the intestinal wall muscles, allowing stool to pass.